Learning

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I Am a Teacher.




Of course, I want my students to become master craftsmen in the arts of reading, writing, and mathematics. I will bust-my-bottom every single day so that each of them are successful.

But what is most important to me, for each and every student in my circle-of-influence to learn this year are…

the same skills that we all started learning in kindergarten.

  • Share everything.
  • Play fair.
  • Don’t hit people.
  • Put things back where you found them.
  • Clean up your own mess.
  • Don’t take things that aren’t yours.
  • Say you’re SORRY when you HURT somebody.
  • When you go out into the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands, and stick together.
  • Live a balanced life – learn some and drink some and draw some and paint some and sing and dance and play and work every day some.
  • If the dream is held close to the heart, and imagination is applied to what there is close at hand. Everything is still possible.

― Robert Fulghum, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

If my students begin to comprehend the world a little clearer because of the mastery of the art that I love, and I- in some small way- can continue to allow these ten truths to become planted a little deeper into their lives, then I will be allowed to boldly proclaim… “This Year, I Am a Teacher.”



Written for The Daily Post: The Art and Craft of Blogging: Learning

Topic 9: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 9 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

barber
warnerarchive warner archive clean humphrey bogart haircut

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.)  I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

This Flash Fiction piece HAS TO INCLUDE a WHISTLING BARBER! 

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a flash fiction story this week using this picture prompt. Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion. Try to keep your flash story between 200 and 500 words.

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing punctuation and spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your story, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 8: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 8 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

turkeys
Männlich Wild turkey strutting im Frühjahr. Lizenzfreie Bilder

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.) I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a haiku this week using this picture prompt. (Actually, if you can… create a series of haiku to tell the story.) Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion.

REMEMBER: The Rules for a Haiku 

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

REMEMBER: For Haiku…. WORD CHOICE!!!! is VEry, VEry, VEry ImPoRtAnT!

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your haiku, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 7: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 7 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

white-tailed_deer
White-Tailed Deer: Wikipedia

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.)  I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a haiku this week using this picture prompt. (Actually, if you can… create a series of haiku to tell the story.) Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion.

REMEMBER: The Rules for a Haiku 

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

REMEMBER: For Haiku…. WORD CHOICE!!!! is VEry, VEry, VEry ImPoRtAnT!

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your haiku, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 6: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 6 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

pumpkins

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.)  I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a haiku this week using this picture prompt. (Actually, if you can… create a series of haiku to tell the story.) Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion.

REMEMBER: The Rules for a Haiku 

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

REMEMBER: For Haiku…. WORD CHOICE!!!! is VEry, VEry, VEry ImPoRtAnT!

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your haiku, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 5: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 5 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

chickens
Morguefile.com October

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.)  I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a haiku this week using this picture prompt. (Actually, if you can… create a series of haiku to tell the story.) Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion.

REMEMBER: The Rules for a Haiku 

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

REMEMBER: For Haiku…. WORD CHOICE!!!! is VEry, VEry, VEry ImPoRtAnT!

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your haiku, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 4: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 4 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

turkeys
Männlich Wild turkey strutting im Frühjahr. Lizenzfreie Bilder

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.) I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a flash fiction story this week using this picture prompt. Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion. Try to keep your flash story between 200 and 500 words.

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing punctuation and spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your story, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 3: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 3 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

white-tailed_deer
White-Tailed Deer: Wikipedia

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.) I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a flash fiction story this week using this picture prompt. Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion. Try to keep your flash story between 200 and 500 words.

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing punctuation and spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your story, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 2: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 2 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

pumpkins

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.) I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog.

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a flash fiction story this week using this picture prompt. Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion. Try to keep your flash story between 200 and 500 words.

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing punctuation and spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your story, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries. Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.

Topic 1: WG 2016-2017

Welcome to Topic 1 of Writer’s Guild 2016-2017

chickens
Morguefile.com October

Welcome. I’m glad you decided to join us. (Yes, that is sarcastically tacky.) I know… and you know… that this is an assignment, but hopefully you will enjoy the assignments in our blog. 

Here’s How to Play

Every two weeks, I will add five to seven photo/ topic prompts to our blog. Your job is to pick from the ones you like and write a grand flash, or a haiku, or a free verse. I will try to keep switching it up so that there is something new here often.

Step One

Create a flash fiction story this week using this picture prompt. Create your story with a intriguing beginning, a swift-moving plot (the middle) and an appropriate conclusion. Try to keep your flash story between 200 and 500 words.

Step Two

After completing your first draft, read your story six or seven times to make sure that it reads smoothly. Remember, you- the author- already know what you want to say… but are you sure that your reader understands what you wanted to say? Have you left out any important parts? Are there better word choices that you could make that would make your story a better story?

Step Three

AFTER HAVING READ YOUR STORY OVER and OVER for a THREE or FOUR DAY PERIOD… proofread your story for the final chance at fixing punctuation and spelling errors. Then invite a fellow student to critique your work.

Step Four

Once you are happy with your story, place it in the comments sections of our blog entries.  Be sure to include your PEN NAME only!

Soon, fellow readers will read your flash and rejoice in your accomplishments.

Be sure to invite your folks and grandfolks and uncles and aunts and grand-cousins to follow our blog.



IMPORTANT NOTE: Remember to have three of four writing selections in your writing wheel.